BRINGING YOU INFORMATION.  PROVIDING YOU A PLATFORM.

 

 
THE PHARMA REVIEW (JANUARY - FEBRUARY 2011)

Current Approaches to Management of Obesity – Role of Pharmacist

R. K. Rishi

Introduction: Obesity is a chronic, complex, multifactorial disorder with increasing prevalence in modern society. It is a disease resulting from various genetic factors and environmental conditions (nutrition, sedentary life-style, psychological factors). In many industrialized nations, obesity is now considered an epidemic. Worldwide prevalence rates of obesity and overweight are rising and safe and effective treatment strategies are urgently needed.
Obesity is defined as a complex medical and social condition characterized by excessive accumulation of body fat that may result from an imbalance between calorie intake and calorie expenditure. Even though there is a distinction between the terms obesity and overweight, they are often used interchangeably. Overweight is defined as excess body being weight relative to height, using body mass index (BMI) as an indicator. A person may be considered obese when his/her body fat contents exceed 30% of total weight in women or 25% in men. BMI is the most widely and acceptable method of determining the extent of being overweight and/or obese.
Obesity is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease as well as the metabolic syndrome comprising abdominal obesity, increased fasting blood glucose levels, dyslipidemia and hypertension. All these are recognized cardiovascular risk factors. Obesity may be a complicating factor for a number of diseases. Prevalence of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance, coronary artery disease, stroke, sleep apnea, degenerative joint disease, hirsutism, endometriosis, and cancers of the breast, colon, or prostate are relatively high.
Etiology Increased fat tissue deposits in the body occur when calorie intake exceeds calorie expenditure. Overeating of carbohydrates and fats results in excess energy, which is usually deposited and stored in the body as fat when not consumed. Physiologically, the body responds to being underweight with an increased tendency to eating by increased hunger and decreased metabolic rate. However, the human body does not respond to combat obesity. There are many reasons for obesity which include physiological factors, overeating, genetic predisposition, disturbance of hunger and satiety centers in the brain, social and environmental factors, psychological factors, medical conditions and the intake of certain medications.

 

 

Go to Content Index Page

PHARMA REVIEW - ARTICLES ARCHIVE ( COMPLETE LIST)

 

The above content is an abstract only. For the full Article please contact:
KONGPOSH Publications Pvt. Ltd.
ICS House, C-19, Commercial Complex, SDA, Opp. IIT Gate, New Delhi, India -110016
Tel.: 26855839, 9811195411
Email: kongposhpub@gmail.com, Website: http://www.kppub.com

 
 
 
 

Copyright KONGPOSH PUBLICATIONS Pvt. Ltd.