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THE PHARMA REVIEW (JULY - AUGUST 2011)

Clinically Relevant Drug Interactions with Newer Drugs: A Review

Uday Venkat Mateti*1, Anantha Naik Nagappa2, Srikala Patha3

Abstract
A clinically relevant drug-drug interaction (DDI) occurs when the effectiveness or toxicity of one medication is altered by the administration of another medicine or a substance that is administered for medical purposes. In addition to co-administration of other drugs, concomitant ingestion of Nutrients include food, beverages (including alcohol), dietary supplements or citrus fruit or fruit juice could also alter systemic exposure of drugs, thus leading to adverse drug reactions or loss of efficacy. Drug interactions being both beneficial and harmful are important to be known to provide a beneficial effect of the same or to prevent the adverse event that could be seen. This article tries to highlight the some of the clinically significant drug interactions with newer drugs.

 
A clinically relevant drug-drug interaction (DDI) occurs when the effectiveness or toxicity of one medication is altered by the administration of another medicine or a substance that is administered for medical purposes (to be distinguished from drug-food interactions). In addition to co-administration of other drugs, concomitant ingestion of Nutrients include food, beverages (including alcohol), dietary supplements or citrus fruit or fruit juice could also alter systemic exposure of drugs, thus leading to adverse drug reactions or loss of efficacy.1 Clinical risk management of potential DDIs is required in patients using drugs to influence the benefit-risk profile positively. Especially within hospitals, this might be an important factor, as patients are severely ill and multiple medications may be prescribed simultaneously. Drug interactions (DIs) may result in adverse drug events that could be prevented, but in many cases the available information on potential DIs is not easily transferable to clinical practice. The majority of studies date from preclinical or premarketing phases, using animals or human-derived sources that may not accurately reflect the growing clinical complexity of high-risk populations, such as the elderly, women, children, patients with chronic disease, polytherapy and impaired organ functions. 2 Despite the rise in technologies to identify potential DDIs, the ability of physicians and other prescribers to recognize potential DDIs is essential to reduce their occurrence. These days’ studies in this aspect are concentrated mostly towards metabolic type of interactions and transport mediated interactions. Antifungal agents, Anti epileptic drugs, Anti Retroviral agents, Proton pump Inhibitors, Cardiovascular drugs, Immunosupressants are different classes of drugs which are generally involved in drug-drug interactions.

 

 

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